• Sensationalist and misleading marketing. “Get your green card in months!!” appearing on Facebook over and over is not the way to introduce a new product or service to people. Sure, it might work in the short term, but people don’t want to be interrupted by unwanted and aggressive marketing. Buying cell phone numbers and sending out spam text messages devalues the program, the company, and the entire industry. Is it any wonder why people who respond to adds like that say “Are you and this whole thing real?”.

  • Projects and Regional Centers are not taking time to patiently educate people. Quarterly and yearly sales goals mean that “closing the sale” is the only priority. The best projects build trust months or even years before they ask clients to buy anything.

  • False expertise. Ok – someone took the time to get a law degree, and maybe even has a little experience in immigration law. That does not make them an expert in EB-5. The complexities of both the immigration elements, and the financial elements require that experts have deep and long term experience specifically within those areas.

  • Undisclosed conflicts of interest. There is a lot of money to be made within EB-5. Many different people see big dollar signs when they hear about the program, and this can cause a range of issues and conflicts. For example, almost all investors don’t realize that the lawyer they are working with, gets different fees based on which project he sends them to. If a lawyer is going to get 200% more money from one project than another – how confident can people be that he/she will give proper guidance?

  • Short Term Marketing Blitzes. Making the decision to pursue the American Investment Immigration program is not one to be taken lightly or quickly. When US-based projects are only in town for a few days, it is symbolic of their lack of commitment to being responsive to client needs. Potential investors see this, and are justifiably put off. 

  • Lack of Specialization. There are a few, large, well-known “visa buffet” companies. St. Kitts, Malta, U.K., US, etc. If someone is interested in immigrating, they likely have a country that will meet the need. However, given the complexity, difficulty, and overall challenges of the EB-5 world, the Middle East requires a much more focused approach. Additionally, holding up the U.S. program next to say, the Cyprus program, massively devalues the American program. The American program is unique in almost every way – it’s size, the benefits, the timeline, and the desirability of living in America. People educating the market need to behave like it.